En pointe. With Knives.

Suspenseful, stunning, and somehow extremely compelling to watch…

Pure emotion?


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Incredible Ballerina Performs En Pointe with Knife Shoes

(from My Modern Met)


“En Puntas is a video installation by artist Javier Pérez featuring ballerina Amélie Ségarra performing an incredible dance atop a grand piano, entirely en pointe, wearing a customized set of pointe shoes that extend beyond the toe box with a pair of sharp kitchen knives. As if dancing on the tips of your toes for an extended period of time isn’t enough, Ségarra has the added pressure of balancing on a thinner platform, from an even greater height.


The thought of someone even managing to stand on the potentially dangerous footwear is absolutely astounding. The fact that Ségarra maintains her balance and even leaves her mark as she purposely scrapes the sharp-edged blades across the piano is both exhilarating and frightening to watch. The intense performance is made all the more gripping as the elegant dancer tiptoes closer to the edge, making it difficult to avert one’s eyes….”


For the rest, click here. The film is below…

(The artist’s website is here.)


Javier Pérez – EN PUNTAS (extracts) from Javier Pérez on Vimeo.


Building Guedelon Castle: Archaeology In Reverse

“Not only are many of the members of the project in period dress, but there is also a medieval restaurant.”


We are intrigued…


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From Atlas Obscura
Treigny, France
Guedelon Castle
Despite centuries of architectural innovation, this French castle is being built like it’s the 13th century


“In a remote forest clearing in Burgundy, France, a 13th-century castle is slowly being constructed using only the tools, techniques, and materials that would have been available to the builders of the day. It’s archaeology in reverse.


The Guédelon project was started in 1997 at this location, which was chosen because it was near an abandoned stone quarry, a pond for water, and in a forest that could provide wood. The whole exercise is an experimental archaeology endeavor that seeks to discover what it would have been like to create a castle centuries ago, not by making guesses from artifacts from the past, but by experiencing it in real time. Knotted rope is used to make measurements, stone is imperfectly cut to denote the station of the castle’s owner, and rock is chiseled by hand.”


For the rest, and pictures, click here.


Thermal scans reveal “anomalies” in Egypt’s pyramids of Giza

It’s an exciting time for those of us that are obsessed with the Giza Plateau!


We were just finished reading a piece from Disclose.TV about the “lost labyrinth of Egypt” —  a “mysterious underground complex of caverns and chambers” that is “believed to hold the secrets to mankind’s origin” (read more on that here), when up popped a piece from IFLS on new data suggesting there may be hidden spaces within the great pyramid itself. (We here at the Museum cannot help but ask ourselves, could there be a connection between the anomalies and the lost labyrinth?)




What’s your theory on the newly discovered anomalies?


From IFLS,


Scientists Have Found Something Very Mysterious In The Great Pyramid Of Giza
by Tom Hale


“The pyramids of Giza have left us gazing in astonishment and curiosity for four thousand years. Even after hundreds of years of archeological and scientific exploration, they’re continuing to surprise us. A recent project has found striking “thermal anomalies” in the eastern side of the Great Pyramid of Giza.


The discovery was part of the Operation Scan Pyramid, a recent project that has already used “cosmic rays” and drones to analyze the pyramids by a group of scientists from Egypt, France, Canada and Japan, under authority from the Egyptian Antiquities Ministry.


With the ongoing plan to discover new tombs and hidden burial chambers, the project used thermal imaging technology on the pyramid, which found mysterious heat spots on the monuments. At the lower level of the Cheops, or Great Pyramid, they found an area of neighboring blocks that had a temperature gap far greater than would normally be expected for adjacent stones made with different qualities of limestone.


Since air gaps don’t hold heat as well as rock or sand, a difference in temperature could reveal information about the pyramid’s structure hidden beneath the surface. However, the team still aren’t certain what exactly it is. It could be a tomb, a cavity, a passage or even just a crack in the rock.


In a statement, the Egyptian antiquities ministry said the scientists had “concluded the existence of several thermal anomalies that were observed on all monuments during the heating-up or the cooling-down phases,” referring to surveys taken during sunrise, when the structures warm up from the Sun, and sunset, when they lose heat.


“To explain such anomalies, a lot of hypotheses and possibilities could be drawn up; presence of voids behind the surface, internal air currents,” it added…”


For the rest, click here.



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