Archive for the 'Mythology' Category

“beauty and magic is not the absence of terror”

Unsanitized tales…

 

The Importance of Being Scared: Polish Nobel Laureate Wislawa Szymborska on Fairy Tales and the Necessity of Fear

 

By Maria Popova (Brain Pickings)

 

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“Andersen had the courage to write stories with unhappy endings. He didn’t believe that you should try to be good because it pays … but because evil stems from intellectual and emotional stuntedness and is the one form of poverty that should be shunned.”

 

“If you want your children to be intelligent,” Einstein is credited with proclaiming, “read them fairy tales. If you want them to be very intelligent, read them more fairy tales.” Intelligence, of course, is a loose grab-bag term that encompasses multiple manifestations, but the insight attributed to Einstein applies most unequivocally to the ninth of developmental psychologist Howard Gardner’s multiple intelligences: existential intelligence.

 

Fairy tales — the proper kind, those original Brothers Grimm and Hans Christian Andersen tales I recall from my Eastern European childhood, unsanitized by censorship and unsweetened by American retellings — affirm what children intuitively know to be true but are gradually taught to forget, then to dread: that the terrible and the terrific spring from the same source, and that what grants life its beauty and magic is not the absence of terror and tumult but the grace and elegance with which we navigate the gauntlet….”

 

More here.

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Glastenbury and The Bennington Triangle

As a follow-up to our recent post about a missing 1940’s Bennington student, here is a bit more on the mysteries of the “Vermont Triangle” —

 

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The Vanished Town of Glastenbury and The Bennington Triangle
By Chad Abramovich

 

“Those who know me know that I’m a huge cartography buff. That love really perpetuated when I was 10, when my mother bought me a DeLorme atlas of Vermont, and I became enthralled with it, thoroughly memorizing every detail I could. But what is it about maps that are so irresistible to me?

 

Maybe because of their limitless potential, and their ability to unlock the mysteries of our world. Maps tell us how things in this world relate to one another, they take data and turn it into something tangible, something understandable, and maybe something that provokes thought or feelings. Several different types of information can be conveyed at the same time, melding several different ideas into a united idea. Lines to convey topography, more lines to convey boundaries between rock layers, towns, states and countries. More lines for faults, colors for bodies of water, forest land and types of climates. Maybe it’s because maps provide some sort of order, putting everything where it needs to be. Or just the opposite. They’ve always helped me make sense of my thoughts and ideas, and even draw ideas from things that haven’t been categorized or plotted yet.

 

I loved getting to know the great state I lived in. But one place really stood out to me.

 

A perfect square, that yellow dotted line indicating it was the boundary of a town, with the word “Glastenbury” printed inside. But inside the square, there was nothing but contour lines, indicating several mountains and rugged wilderness. I was enthralled by the fact that this town apparently had nothing in it. In the very top left corner, in small print, was the word “Fayville”, plotted on a dotted line that seemed to be a secondary road, meandering its way from Shaftsbury deep into the hills, and ending in the middle of nowhere. Even for rural Vermont standards, this was pretty desolate. I knew there was something different about this place, it challenged my young and naive view of the world. Why wasn’t there anything in Glastenbury like other towns around it?

 

It had a mystery to it, and I wanted to know more….”

 

For the rest, click here.

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Lost In the “Bennington Triangle” – The case of Paula Jeen Welden

Kidnapping? Bigfoot? Serial killer? Suicide? What happened to the Bennington College girl who wandered off campus one day never to be found again?

 

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from NEW YORK DAILY NEWS,

 

Vt. student’s body never found after 1946 disappearance

by Mara Bovsun

 

Paula Jeen Welden would be nearing 88 years old today, perhaps a great-grandmother, an artist, or a gardener who delights in taking long walks in Vermont’s Green Mountains.

 

Or, she might be in another country, under an assumed name, leading a life that bears no resemblance to her first 18 years.

 

Or, as some people believe, she may have wandered into an area that has been dubbed the “Bennington Triangle,” where she’s a captive of extraterrestrials or Bigfoot.
Or she may be dead, the victim of a serial killer.

 

All kinds of theories have swirled around the girl’s disappearance — from suicide, to accident, to eloping with a secret boyfriend, to murder — since the last time anyone saw her in 1946.

 

But the truth is, no one knows what happened to her…”

 

For the rest, click here.

 

 

 

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