Archive for the 'Mysterious News' Category

Burial mounds, chapels…Stonehenge is more than just stone.

In case you missed this before, or did not have a chance to see the pictures, here’s a bit on those discoveries made at Stonehenge last year. (Not that we mystery-minded folks were ever all that surprised by this news!)

 

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Archaeologists Have Made An Incredible Discovery At Stonehenge

 

by George Dvorsky (io9)

 

“Using powerful ground-penetrating radar, investigators working around Stonehenge have detected a trove of previously unknown burial mounds, chapels, shrines, pits — and most remarkable of all — a massive megalithic monument made up of more than 50 giant stones buried along a 1,082-foot-long c-shaped enclosure.

 

This news is unreal — and it’s resetting virtually everything we thought we knew about Stonehenge. Just a week after finding out that Stonehenge was once a complete circle, archaeologists from Birmingham and Bradford universities, and from the Ludwig Boltzman Institute in Vienna, have shattered the image of Stonehenge as a desolate and lonely place…”

 

For more on this, and pictures, click here.

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P.S. Reality doesn’t exist until we measure it.

We are constantly both amused and amazed by the fact that reality is consistently proving to be even more magical than magic. As science progresses, the schism between the known and the unknown, the impossible and the provable, becomes smaller and smaller…

 

From Science Alert,

 

Reality doesn’t exist until we measure it, quantum experiment confirms

Mind = blown.

 

by Fiona MacDonald

 

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“Australian scientists have recreated a famous experiment and confirmed quantum physics’s bizarre predictions about the nature of reality, by proving that reality doesn’t actually exist until we measure it – at least, not on the very small scale.

 

That all sounds a little mind-meltingly complex, but the experiment poses a pretty simple question: if you have an object that can either act like a particle or a wave, at what point does that object ‘decide’?

Australian scientists have recreated a famous experiment and confirmed quantum physics’s bizarre predictions about the nature of reality, by proving that reality doesn’t actually exist until we measure it – at least, not on the very small scale.

 

That all sounds a little mind-meltingly complex, but the experiment poses a pretty simple question: if you have an object that can either act like a particle or a wave, at what point does that object ‘decide’?

 

Our general logic would assume that the object is either wave-like or particle-like by its very nature, and our measurements will have nothing to do with the answer. But quantum theory predicts that the result all depends on how the object is measured at the end of its journey. And that’s exactly what a team from the Australian National University has now found.

 

“It proves that measurement is everything. At the quantum level, reality does not exist if you are not looking at it,” lead researcher and physicist Andrew Truscott said…”

 

For the rest, click here.

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The Nocturnal Picaresque

A “noctuary” is  “an account of what passes at night” — this lovely little word opens the door to so many mysterious musings…

 

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The Nightwalker and the Nocturnal Picaresque

 

The introduction of street lighting to 17th-century London saw an explosion of nocturnal activity in the capital, most of it centering around the selling of sex. Matthew Beaumont explores how some writers, with the intention of condemning these nefarious goings-on, took to the city’s streets after dark, and in the process gave birth to a peculiar new literary genre.

 

“At the end of the seventeenth century a new literary genre or subgenre emerged in England, one that might be characterized as the nocturnal picaresque. Its authors, who were moralists or satirists or social tourists, or all of these at the same time, and who were almost invariably male, purported to recount their episodic adventures as pedestrians patrolling the streets of the metropolis at night.

 

These narratives, which often provided detailed portraits of particular places, especially ones with corrupt reputations, also paid close attention to the precise times when more or less nefarious activities unfolded in the streets. As distinct from diaries, they were noctuaries (in his Dictionary of the English Language [1755], Samuel Johnson defined a “noctuary” simply as “an account of what passes at night”).1 These apparently unmediated, more or less diaristic accounts of what happened during the course of the night on the street embodied either a tragic or a comic parable of the city, depending on whether their authors intended to celebrate its nightlife or condemn it as satanic…”

 

For the rest, click here to go to The Public Domain Review.

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