Archive for the 'Psychology & The Mind' Category

The Zimbabwe Close Encounter

This is one of the most compelling close-encounters stories we have heard. Why have we not heard more about this?

 

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Zimbabwe UFO Child Conactee Speaks Publicly For The 1st Time
by Sid Goldberg, Earth Mystery News

 

“One of the most outstanding UFO experiences involving a group of children took place on September 16, 1994. Approximately 60 children between 5 and 12 years old were playing outside their school on the outskirts of the capital of Zimbabwe when they saw a large spaceship and several smaller craft gliding over the scrubland.

 

The spacecraft landed beside their playground. The children claim that they were approached by beings from the ships and that the whole encounter lasted about 15 minutes.

 

Emily Trim was one of those children. As a young student at the Ariel primary school near the town of Ruwa in Zimbabwe,  the incident was made famous when it was covered by the BBC, who interviewed the children soon after the incident. Harvard psychiatrist Dr. John Mack traveled to the school to interview the children and recorded their extraordinary accounts…”

 

For the rest of the story click here. The video of the interview with Emily can be found here.

 

Below is the original 1994 BBC video interview by Dr. John Mack of those young children at the Ariel primary school near the town of Ruwa in Zimbabwe. This is not to be missed if you are at all interested in UFOlogy.

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Can A Nightmare Kill You?

As all sleep paralysis or night terror sufferers will tell you, there’s nothing more real than their nightmares…

 

From Buzzfeed, an excellent piece on the mystery and the terror:

 

Can You Die From A Nightmare?

by Doree Shafrir

 

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“It is the middle of the night, and there is something very wrong in my apartment. I leap up from my bed and rush to the closet and crouch down and throw aside my shoes, which are arranged on a rack on the floor. I know I must work quickly; I am breathing fast and hard. There?—?there, behind the shoes, I see it: I don’t know what it is, but it needs to come out, or I am going to die. I pull and pull and finally get it out.

 

But something is still wrong. I am now completely panicked, and I jump back onto my bed and lean over the half-wall that my bed is up against, overlooking the hallway. There, I see what’s causing all the problems, and I push it downward and off the wall with all my might. It shatters loudly, glass flying everywhere.

 

Then, finally, I wake up. My two dogs are cowering in the corner, and I put on shoes to sweep up the glass. I am confused and embarrassed, though there is no one besides the dogs there to see that I just pushed a framed poster off a wall and broke it. I clean up the glass and go back to sleep, and it is not until the morning, when I see my shoes scattered everywhere, that I look into the closet and realize that I have also ripped the TV cable completely out of the back wall of my closet.

 

These brief but incredibly vivid nightmares happen for years: they’re never quite so violent as that first one, which happened around 2003, but almost always as scary. I don’t know what to call them, but they become a familiar part of bedtime, and there are times when I am afraid to go to bed because I know that just as I start to fall asleep, I will be jolted aware in a state of sheer terror. Then, just as suddenly as they start, they ebb for a time, and I wonder if I’ve gotten better. But they always come back.

 

Here are some other things I’ve believed in the middle of the night:

They are monitoring my breathing. If I don’t hold my breath and stay completely still, I am going to die. I am not allowed to move at all, or they will know, and they will kill me…”

 

For the rest, click here.

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The “first-night effect”…

It’s no wonder we never got any rest at those sleepovers when we were kids…

 

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Half Your Brain Stands Guard When Sleeping In A New Place

Heard on All Things Considered

 

When you sleep in unfamiliar surroundings, only half your brain is getting a good night’s rest.

 

“The left side seems to be more awake than the right side,” says Yuka Sasaki, an associate professor of cognitive, linguistic and psychological sciences at Brown University.

 

The finding, reported Thursday in the journal Current Biology, helps explain why people tend to feel tired after sleeping in a new place. And it suggests people have something in common with birds and sea mammals, which frequently put half their brain to sleep while the other half remains on guard.

 

Sleep researchers discovered the “first-night effect” decades ago, when they began studying people in sleep labs. The first night in a lab, a person’s sleep is usually so bad that researchers simply toss out any data they collect…”

 

Read the rest here.

 

Listen below:

 

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