Archive for the 'Psychology & The Mind' Category

A provocative new theory on the immortality of the soul…

The Quantum Theory of Consciousness states that the soul is maintained in micro-tubules of the brain cells. The following article gives a good overview of what this means, and what it implies about death and the afterlife.

 

 

From Peace Quarters,
Scientists Found That The Soul Doesn’t Die – It Goes Back To The Universe

 

“According to two leading scientists, the human brain is in fact a ‘biological computer’ and the consciousness of humans is a program run by the quantum computer located inside the brain that even continues to exist after we die.

 

As experts explain it; “after people die, their soul comes back to the universe, and it does not die.”

 

The debate about the existence of the soul and whether it is immortal or dies with the person is an endless story that for centuries has occupied the time of the great thinkers of universal history. Its mysterious nature continues to fascinate different areas of science, but now a group of researchers has discovered a new truth about it: the “soul” does not die; it returns to the universe.

 

Since 1996, Dr. Stuart Hameroff, an American Physicist and Emeritus in the Department of Anesthesiology and Psychology, and Sir Roger Penrose, a mathematical physicist at Oxford University, have worked in a Quantum Theory of Consciousness in which they state that the soul is maintained in micro-tubules of the brain cells.

 

Their provocative theory states that the human soul is be contained by the brain cells in structures inside them called micro-tubules…”

 

For the rest, click here.

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The mystery of the Nazca lines solved?

Water is life…

 

 

From Motherboard,

 

Satellite Images Revealed the Secret Meaning of These Ancient Desert Spirals

by Kaleigh Rogers

 

“The Nazca lines are world famous geoglyphs, and their nearby spiral structure help explain why they were built.

 
Imagine staring out the window of an airplane and seeing a 1,200-foot hummingbird carved into the earth. Now imagine realizing that design was carved sometime between 1 and 700 AD. That’s how the Nazca lines were first introduced to the western world.

 

Found in the southern desert region of Peru, the Nazca lines are massive drawings in the soil, also known as geoglyphs. They’re named after the ancient civilization that lived in the region: the Nazca. The lines range from spirals to intricate designs like monkeys, llamas, and flowers. Some of the drawings are up to 1,200 feet—that’s more than three football fields—which means they’re best viewed from above, in a plane, or from a satellite.

 

But they were created long before planes or satellites, leaving generations of scholars to ponder why they were made, particularly if the Nazca people couldn’t enjoy the full glory of their work. Thanks to satellite imaging, scientists believe they have a good hypothesis for the mystery behind these lines. They were linked to the most precious desert resource: water…”

 

For the rest. click here.

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The Forgotten Victims of Jack the Ripper

We are fascinated by the Ripper – he is a legend, with countless books and films dedicated to his mystery. There’s an entire field dedicated to the study of his crimes: Ripperology.

 

But who were his tragic victims? Let’s find out…

 

 

The Forgotten Lives Of Jack The Ripper’s Victims
By Elisabeth Sherman

 

Because he was the first celebrity serial killer, Jack the Ripper’s victims and their tragic lives were always overshadowed by the man himself.

 

“Head to London for a dose of the macabre, and you won’t be disappointed. Guided tours of the Whitechapel district — where in 1888 legendary serial killer Jack the Ripper brutally cut the throats of five prostitutes and removed their organs — continue to draw in droves of tourists to this day.

 

There’s the Jack the Ripper museum, too, which opened last year to controversy. According to historian Fern Riddell, the museum intended to tell the “history of women in the East End,” but activists said the museum mainly “glamorises sexual violence against women.”

 

Beyond the outcry, it’s not entirely surprising that the museum shifted focus away from Jack the Ripper’s victims and back onto the killer himself. After all, the mystery surrounding who he was and his motivations never ceases to captivate an audience — so much so that there’s a whole field dedicated to the study of his crimes: Ripperology.

 

As some have noted, though, at its core this “thriving Ripper industry” is misogynistic, and “commercially [exploits] real-life murder victims.”

 

Regardless of the truths these criticisms may highlight, fascination with Jack the Ripper and serial killers like him endure — and experts don’t see that changing any time soon. As appears in Psychology Today, “the incomprehensibility of such actions drives society to understand why serial killers do incredibly horrible things…serial killers appeal to the most basic and powerful instinct in all of us—that is, survival.”

 

This, coupled with media market dynamics, helps cement sustained public interest in figures like Jack the Ripper…”

 

For the rest, click here. And if you’re interested, here are The Ripper Letters.

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